Workforce Training

Sector Mapping Tool

University of Hawaii System
http://www.uhcc.hawaii.edu/OVPCC/
States are notoriously blind when it comes to "seeing" the economy. In addition, little is known about the connections between academic offerings and the economic needs of the state. This tool forces discussions and makes clear the alignment or lack of alignment between the educational system and the economy of the state. In addition to higher ed connecting better to the economy, more needs to be done to connect K12 to higher ed. This site makes this connection as well.

This tool visualizes the entire economy of the state organized under sectors. The entire economy can be visualized and heat mapped. Overlaid on top of the heat map, one can visualize UH degree program offerings. Each stem job in the state can be highlighted. Each sector contains all the jobs in that sector. Every job in the state has a landing page and every landing page has the following info on each job: past and projected demand; salary ranges and comparison of salaries between all states for that job; degree attainment levels actually used by industry; production of degrees vs. demand in the state; skill sets, hard and soft, current companies advertising for this job by name and by county, and more. There is a cross sector search mechanism as well that is able to search across sectors.Therefore, the connection between jobs and degrees is made clear and the demand for that job can show whether education is under or over producing. One can also see high demand areas where there are no degrees being offered.

0
Peter Quigley

quigleyp@hawaii.edu

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Business Partner Specialist

Lake Area Technical Institute
http://www.lakeareatech.edu
Many businesses in South Dakota are not able to expand because they lack the skilled workforce to keep up with current demands. Couple that with the state’s low unemployment rate, number of retirements in the next 5-10 years, and number of young people available for the workforce, they won’t be able to keep up with employment projections, especially in the advanced manufacturing sector. Employers need better, more efficient ways to access and support a skilled and competent workforce for high demand jobs. LATI is using TAA Grant funds to address this issue.

Helping industry recognize their role in student success is crucial. Particularly for low income students, industry support can be the key to their ultimate success. LATI is focused on being part of the workforce solution through the Business Partner Specialist position. The Business Partner Specialist is tasked with enhancing and expanding business and industry relationships, updating the image of advanced manufacturing to provide a more accurate depiction of what these jobs entail to the public, and finding ways to increase the pipeline of skilled workers.
More defined duties of this position include:
• Promote programs of study to fill high demand jobs with non-traditional students.
• Work with businesses to identify potential entry level employees for upskilling.
• Develop an individualized training plan for businesses.
• Identify off-campus lab sites through employer partners and community facilities.
• Create a model for businesses to use to “Grow Their Own”.
• Assist with a marketing campaign to re-image Advanced Manufacturing jobs experiencing shortages.
• Promote Build Dakota Scholarship and LATI’s Stretch the Million program to provide full ride scholarships in high-need workforce programs at SD’s technical institutes.
This model is being put into effect with a precision machining company called Graco. In the Fall of 2016, a precision machining e-Degree student approached his employer, Graco, to develop a plan to allow him to complete the coursework online and to do the hands-on labs at his employer’s. Graco is in Sioux Falls, 90 miles south of Watertown. The Business Partner Specialist, Curriculum Administrator, and PM Instructors approved a plan allowing the student to work and earn a credential. The student is currently enrolled, completing online coursework, and learning skills required by the program that also help his employer meet work production demands.

0
Terri Cordrey

terri.cordrey@lakeareatech.edu

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Business Partner Specialist

Lake Area Technical Institute
http://www.lakeareatech.edu
Many businesses in South Dakota are not able to expand because they lack the skilled workforce to keep up with current demands. Couple that with the state’s low unemployment rate, number of retirements in the next 5-10 years, and number of young people available for the workforce, they won’t be able to keep up with employment projections, especially in the healthcare and advanced manufacturing fields. Employers need better, more efficient ways to access and support a skilled and competent workforce for high demand jobs. LATI is using TAA Grant funds from Rounds 3 and 4 to address this issue.

The state of South Dakota is aware of and concentrated on developing solutions to workforce shortages. LATI is focused on being part of the solution by piloting a Business Partner Specialist position through TAA Grant funds. The Business Partner Specialist is tasked with enhancing and expanding business and industry relationships, updating the image of the healthcare and advanced manufacturing fields to provide a more accurate depiction of what these jobs entail to the public, and finding ways to increase the pipeline of skilled workers.
More defined duties of this position include:
• Promote programs of study to fill high demand jobs with non-traditional students.
• Work with businesses to identify potential entry level employees for upskilling.
• Develop an individualized training plan for businesses.
• Identify off-campus lab sties through employer partners and community facilities.
• Create a model for businesses to use to “Grow Their Own”.
• Assist with a marketing campaign to re-image jobs experiencing shortages, such as Healthcare and Advanced Manufacturing.
In December 2014, Denny Sanford and the state of South Dakota contributed $50 million towards the development of a fund to provide full ride scholarships in high-need workforce programs at SD’s technical institutes. Even though this wasn’t part of the original job description for the position, it quickly became a way for LATI to work with businesses to fill job openings with skilled workers. What evolved was LATI’s Stretch the Million program. Industry partners who support a skilled scholar with half of the total college tuition and qualifying expenses can request Build Dakota funds to be used to cover the remaining costs. The overall goal of Stretch the Million program is to add even more skilled employees, with industry support, to the critical needs workforce pipeline in SD.

0
Terri Cordrey

terri.cordrey@lakeareatech.edu

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Best Practices Booklet - Uses of Grant Funds

Colorado Community College System
http://www.cccs.edu

Perkins federal funds are formula funds and have been available for so long that they are taken for granted. In the past, the funds tended to be used for program maintenance. A new project-based design for grant fund Local Plans was implemented and a paradigm shift was needed. A field based advisory council was implemented to support innovation and to facilitate strategic use of the grant funds. Business and industry council members especially liked to visit sites and see the use of the funds in action.

A cost effective method to evaluate results of the uses of the grant funds in a fair and non-threatening manner. Business and industry representatives enjoy onsite visits and become advocates of the programs and the funds. Peers learn from each other. Models of best fund usage are provided to all eligible grant recipients. The public and policymakers can see how the funds are used to enhance career and technical education program quality. The volunteers act as a liaison between the state’s grant director and the sub-recipients. The visits by the volunteers are not audits or monitoring so the atmosphere is relaxed and open. The volunteers can provide insight to state staff about professional development needs. The process becomes an indirect train the trainer system that distributes best strategies and adds voices from the field to promote innovation and continuous improvement. The selected sites can share the publication with their own boards and constituents and be proud of the recognition. More sets of eyes are watching how the money is being used.

4
Average: 4 (1 vote)
Lorrie Toni

lorrie.toni@cccs.edu

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Career Pathway Roadmap WebTool & Open Source Agreement

Oregon Department of Community Colleges & Workforce Development
http://www.MyPathCareers.org

To provide education, career, and labor marketing information for students, advisors, counselors, parents, and others on specific occupations including job advance, skills and wage progression.

The Career Pathway Roadmap WebTool is software that is used by Oregon colleges to develop roadmaps that chart courses, certificates, degrees, occupations, wages, articulation agreements and other information for a given career. Roadmaps are displayed on community college website and are hyperlinked to relevent data on other website. The WebTool developed by the State of Oregon is available through Open Source to be adopted by other states and colleges. More than 350 roadmaps have been developed and are accessible thorugh www.MyPathCareers.org (links to 17 colleges roadmaps; click on the yellow Oregon map). Oregon's Labor Market Information System also displays college roadmaps through its Occupational Reports. Oregon's community colleges use the Career Pathways Roadmap WebTool to create roadmaps for students, advisors, counselors, faculty, and parents to access career information for a specific occupation including competencies, courses, certificates & degree programs, jobs, job progression, wages, articulation agreements, as well as navigation to other pages on a community college's website such as financial aid. Roadmaps are created by the colleges using the WebTool (developed jointly by the colleges and OCCWD) http://oregon.ctepathways.org. The WebTool source code can be downloaded as Open Source from this website.

4.5
Average: 4.5 (2 votes)
Mimi Maduro

mmaduro@cgcc.cc.or.us

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Oregon Green Statewide Career Pathway Roadmap Website

Oregon Department of Community Colleges & Workforce Development
http://www.oregon.gov/CCWD

Provide one place where individuals can learn more about green job education and apprenticeship programs across the state including access to national and industry resources.

Oregon's Green Statewide Green Career Pathways website provides roadmaps for seven "green" emerging and existing occupations showing community college courses, certificates, and programs and apprenticeship programs available across Oregon. Labor market, industry, and career related information is also provided. Go to www.oregongreenpathways.org.

2
Average: 2 (1 vote)
Mimi Maduro

mmaduro@cgcc.cc.or.us

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Wage Outcomes for CCCS Students

Colorado Community College System
http://www.cccs.edu

This report examines the wage outcomes for community college students based on their highest degree attained and cluster of study.

This report examines the wage outcomes for community college students based on their highest degree attained and cluster of study.

3
Average: 3 (1 vote)
Rachel Robinson

rachel.robinson@cccs.edu

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Lessons Learned: Business & Industry Training

Colorado Community College System
http://www.cccs.edu/

The Governor’s Office asked the State Board for Colorado Community Colleges and Occupational Education to review and evaluate the continued collaborative relationships between community colleges and industry to ensure a prepared high‐skilled, high‐demand Colorado workforce with an emphasis on:

  • Continuing to identify promising practices in creating, developing and administering programs directed to businesses short‐term training needs;
  • Continuing to identify training delivery methods to better meet the needs of businesses and workers. The attached document shares the findings from the project & presents tools developed to ensure quality partnerships with local business and industry.

The Colorado Governor’s Jobs Cabinet concluded that to improve workforce quality and better meet the needs of businesses currently and into the future, Colorado needs a proactive strategy that includes, “a combination of existing workforce investment boards (WIBs), a more focused outreach to business, enhanced electronic systems and continued emphasis on Colorado’s P‐20 educational system, especially our community colleges.” A recommendation of the Jobs Cabinet report was for the State Board for Colorado Community Colleges and Occupational Education to review and evaluate the continued collaborative relationships between community colleges and industry to ensure a prepared high‐skilled, high‐demand Colorado workforce with an emphasis on:

  • Continuing to identify promising practices in creating, developing and administering programs directed to businesses short‐term training needs;
  • Continuing to identify training delivery methods to better meet the needs of businesses and workers. The project, Lessons Learned: Business & Industry Partnerships, was to conduct a series of focus groups to determine how well partnerships are working between local business and industry and the colleges. Specifically, the project explored areas such as: • Partnerships developed with the colleges • Components of the partnerships that worked well • Roadblocks to successful fruition of the partnerships • Benefits of the partnerships for college, business/industry and community. • Strategies for continuing additional partnerships. The attached report shares the process used and the outcomes of the project including the design of two important tools that can be used to improve business/industry training at any institution.
0
Geri Anderson

geri.anderson@cccs.edu

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